BOX III. 13 – Writings by Dix - SHORT STORIES AND POEMS

Folder 13 of 22

21 items

The two first listings are stories written by Dix in her earlier years and are drawn on her childhood experiences while living at Woodstock Plantation in Kentucky.  Most copies are from her personal scrap book; so noted at the end of respective citations.

1.  “How Tom Rode Shostring,” by Dorothy Dix.  Drawing by John Inner.  Copy from the Sunday Examiner, nd.

2.  “How Uncle Isom Found Santa Claus,” by Dorothy Dix, nd., transcribed copies by Rosa C. Mayer, New Orleans, February 2, 1923

3.   “How Uncle Isom Found Santa Claus,” by Dorothy Dix, edited by Ruby Patch for publication in Cumberland Lore, The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle, December, 23, 2003.

4.  “Memories by Dorothy Dix – Finding Christmas-A Christmas story adapted from’How Uncle Isom Found Santa Claus’,” edited by Rubye Patch for the Cumberland Lore, The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle, Tuesday December 23, 2003.

5.  Letter to Mrs. A Goldberg from Rosa C. Mayer, New Orleans, February, 1923 about her transcription request of the story by Mr. Starrels.

6.  “Courage,” poem by Dorothy Dix, nd.

 
7.  "The Second Bite of the Apple – There was a cry of love.  Inarticulate and Compelling, and Before Either one Knew It.  She Was Sobbing In His Arms,” by Dorothy Dix, 1902. W.R. Hearst.  Great Britain rights reserved (from her scrap book).

8.  “The Prize Story – How Dan Won The Christmas Stakes,” by Mrs. E. M. Gilmer, Clarksville, Tenn.  The story is accompanied with a biographical sketch of Ms. Gilmer that tells about the $100 offered by The American to her for “the best Christmas story.”  December 21 [early 1890] ns. (from her scrap book).

8.1  “How Dan won the Christmas Stakes,” by Elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer (1880s), edited by Rubye Patch for the Cumberland Lore, The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle, Tuesday December 4, 2007.

9.  “Her Hero,” by Dorothy Dix.  Author “The Miracle of Love,” etc., 1900:  Author Syndicate

10.  “The Last Tournament,” by Elizabeth M. Gilmer.  The story is about the life with horses and the people who rode them and worked at Woodstock.  In the first paragraph she writes about the dining room at Woodstock, “all my life it has seemed to me that there never was so delightful a room as the big dining room at Woodstock.”  New Orleans Picayune, nd. (from her scrap book).

11.  “SHORT STORY OF THE DAY – ‘New Year Resolutions for Men,’” by Dorothy Dix in New Orleans Picayune, nd. (from her scrap book).

12.  “If Chloe, who is my colored ……deadly enemy in the world…she is pleased to call ‘the ranger.’ How this especially ‘ranger’ differs from the ordinary run of kitchen ranges I am unable to say, but Chloe regards it as possessing an unconquerable animosity towards her that makes it smoke and refuses to bake on cold mornings when she is a hurry, and that prompts it to burn up the bread when her back is turned.”  This is one of the stories written by Dix that tells about conversations between Dorothy and Chloe, “who is my colored…deadly enemy in the world.”  The story tells about Chloe going to the cemetery because “hits Decoration day an’ I’m gwine be gone all day, case I’s bleedget to march with my lodge…I got Sa’y Ann Maud to cook yo’ dinner, but you better keep a eye on dat ranger, case dey aint no telling what its gwine do,” ns.,nd. (from her scrap book).

13.  “The Handicap of Sex,” by Dorothy Dix, illustrated by T. D. Skidmore, ns.,nd. (from her scrap book).

14.  “The Dreamed Regained,” by Dorothy Dix.  A sequel, this, and a beautiful and true one, to “When the Dream Fails,” in the May number, ns.,nd. (from her scrap book).

15.  “JIM, The Old Fisherman of Pass Christian,” by Elizabeth M. Gilmer, ns.,nd. (from her scrap book).

16.  “Love on a Cash Basis,” by Dorothy Dix, ns.,nd. (from her scrap book).

17.  “DOROTHY DIX AT THE EXPOSITION – She Says that it is the Greatest Show in the World – Nothing So Beautiful as the Colonnade of the States – Night Scenes at the Fair That Are Veritable Fairyland – Familiar Sights Along the Pike – The Farmer and the Farmer’s Wife are In Evidence,” by [Dorothy Dix] ns.,nd. (from her scrap book).

18.  “THE COLONEL’S SONS – Third Honorable Mention In the – American’s War Story Series,” by Mrs. Elizabeth M. Gilmer, of Clarksville, ns.,nd. (from her scrap book).

19.  “La Petit Manzelle,” by Elizabeth Gilmer.  The setting of the story is…” along the Mexican Gulf Coast, and nothing in America is more un-American,” ns.,nd. (from her scrap book and written before she took the pseudonym Dorothy Dix).

20.  “How Dan won the Christmas Stakes,” by Elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer (1880s), edited by Rubye Patch for the Cumberland Lore, The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle, Tuesday December 4, 2007.


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