Week Two - Using Information Legally and Ethically


Content:

As you begin researching multimedia topics in preparation for the web portfolios you are creating for this course, think about the role of information in our society. Just consider

As you work with information, it is important to understand the legal, economic and social issues surrounding the access and use of information. Some of the issues are

In order to gain an understanding of these issues, you will engage in required readings and answer questions through threaded discussions throughout this week.

Did you find yourself automatically clicking on the link World Wide Web in the opening paragraph above? If not, do so now. Do you think it was ok for your instructor to include a link to this website within this online course? See what that website's administrator told your instructor by clicking here.


Assignment: Readings and Threaded Discussions

Questions will be posted to the Discussion Board on the dates indicated below. Prior to entering the threaded discussion with your classmates and instructors, you should carefully read the required reading and consider the assigned question. You are required to be an active participant in all of the threaded discussions.

Required Readings and Questions Related to Intellectual Property and Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials - try to complete the readings by Tuesday, September 11

Read Ann Okerson's
Who Owns Digital Works? and Esther Dyson's Intellectual Value.

Go to the Discussion Board on Tuesday, September 11 and begin participating in the class discussion regarding these questions:


Required Reading and Questions Related to Free Access to Information, Libraries and Censorship - try to complete the reading by Wednesday, September 12

Read Elisabeth Werby's The Cyber-Library: Legal and Policy Issues Facing Public Libraries in the High-Tech Era.

Go to the Discussion Board on Wednesday, September 12 and begin participating in the class discussion regarding these questions:



Required Readings and Questions Related to
Free vs. Fee-based Access to Information - try to complete the readings by Thursday, September 13

Read the VCU Libraries' Is the Internet the first place to start looking for information on a topic? and the APSU Libraries' How to Search the Internet, including the two links, Which search tool is best for your research? and List & description of search tools. Be sure to check out the UC Berkeley Library's Recommended Search Strategy.

Go to the Discussion Board on Thursday, September 13 and begin participating in the class discussion regarding these questions:



Required Reading and Questions Related to Plagiarism
- try to complete the reading by Friday, September 14

Read the Indiana University Writing Tutorial Services' Plagiarism: What It is and How to Recognize and How to Avoid It.

Go to the Discussion Board on Friday, September 14 and begin to participate in the class discussion regarding these questions:

1) the student
2) the author of the plagiarized work



Additional References
-(if you want to explore the issues further)

Property Rights in the Electronic Dawn

Copyright Law and Electronic Access to Information

Is Information Property? (Legally Speaking)

Copyright in the Digital Networked Environment

Copyright for Computer Authors

Copyright in the Digital Age

Federal Trade Commission Privacy Initiatives

Web Builders' and Multimedia Resources

An Intellectual Property Law Primer for Multimedia and Web Developers

Privacy and Security on the Internet

Consumer Guide to Internet Safety, Privacy and Security

Copyright & Fair Use (Stanford University Libraries)

International Federation of Library Association and Institutions Information Policy: Copyright and Intellectual Property